Archive for the ‘ Marketing Tools ’ Category

Making Moves – Promoting a YouTube Video

I recently posted my most successful YouTube video. Although it hasn’t blown up and been a gigantic viral success, it’s my first video to reach outside of my circle of core fans. In its first four days of being up it has received 160 views and I’m working hard to get more each day.

It has become a core part of hip hop to release free material, oftentimes using instrumentals from popular songs, to promote your own material. So I picked a song that was released last week by Lil Wayne called “6 Foot 7 Foot” that I could tell right off the bat would become a big hit. It’s produced by Bangladesh, the same producer that did “A Millie” with Wayne on The Carter III.

I made the video using iMovie, which came with my MacBook, and photos from my live shows and music video shoots. Using the editing tools available on YouTube and iMovie I added lyrics to the video in the form of blurbs coming out of my mouth, I added title screens to the beginning and end of the vid, and I made it look like I was moving to the music by aligning the pictures to go with the beat.

Some key pointers on how to post a successful YouTube vid and promote it:

1. Keep it short, sweet and entertaining. My video is 1:18 in total and in that time I showcase my lyrics, get my name out there, and link to my other music.

2. Relate your promotional video to something that people are already interested in. Lil Wayne has a huge following already established, so when he releases new material people are going to want to listen to it and talk about it. If you can find the sites where people are talking about related topics and showcase your video there, you might strike a cord with another artist’s fans. For example, I posted my video on http://www.lilwaynehq.com, where there are thousands of people discussing Wayne in very active forums. After one day I got over 30 independent views from that site alone.

3. Get familiar with YouTube’s editing tools. I can’t believe how much extra work you can do after you upload footage to youtube. You can add annotations, add links to your other material and have it all streamlined right into your video.

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Making Moves 6 – Budgeting for a Music Video

I kept notes of the whole music video production process so others can see and plan their own projects.

You’re Welcome

The One Who Got Away Music Video Budget

Food/Drink $170

–       $40 Sandwiches, etc.

–       $50 pizza

–       $80 Alcohol

Wardrobe $322

–       $96 makeup, etc.

–       $16 Costumes

–       $210 = 30 + 180 Masks

Set Design $145

–       $90 fabric

–       $55 Christmas lights, paper to cover window, props

Equipment $80

–       $80 DSLR Cinema Support rental

$717 total spent on video

Equipment Used

Camera:

–       Canon Rebel T2i 550D DSLR

Other Equipment:

–       DSLR Cinema Support

–       Chrosziel Lightweight Follow-Focus

–       100mm Hi Hat

–       Kessler Cinelsider

–       Sachtler Cine 7+7 HD Tripod

Time Spent

Shooting Hours: 13.5 hours (Sat, Dec. 4 5:30pm-2:00am. Sun, Dec. 5 10:00am-3:00pm)

Set Design: 8 hours (Sat, Dec. 4 10:00am-5:00pm. Sun Dec. 5 9:00am-10:00am)

Labor

23 people in total (15 actors, 7 production crew, 1 director)

Making Moves 6 – Making a Low Budget Music Video (pt. 1)

This past weekend was a busy one for me. A group of people transformed the living room of my apartment into a music video set and we successfully shot the video for my song “The One Who Got Away.” It’s the third low budget film set I have been a part of in the last two months as my roommate and one of his friends have shot 2 films over that time. Let’s just say that the smell of stale smoke machine air is quite familiar to me now.

It’s a beautiful thing to see it all come together, to see people devote their time and energy to create something bigger than themselves (for free). We rented and borrowed as much as possible, yet still ran up a bit of a tab. Quality has its price. Although the video was in planning for over a month, there were still some unforeseen problems we ran into on the days of the shoot. The problems mostly involved actors (friends) not showing up, and shot setup taking longer than planned. But it helped a lot to write a detailed shot list and schedule.

Photos of the video shoot are up on my facebook page

Online Video Distribution: Getting More YouTube Views

 

This post that I found on Trackhustle.com gives some tips on how to appeal to a wider audience on YouTube. The videos in the article all succeeded in reaching a large audience and you could learn a lot just be viewing them. These tips are very timely because I am shooting a video this weekend and am hoping to reach a wide audience through a strong viral campaign on YouTube. The video is for my song The One Who Got Away, and has been in the works for over a month now. One of the key takeaways from the article on Trackhustle that I hope we will achieve is to “do something that is so awesome that people have to show their friends.”

Emmett Adler, the director, and I have developed a pretty great story line that follows closely with the lyrics of the song, but takes place at a halloween party. The song is about the regrets of lost love and missed opportunities so it is a universal theme that a lot of people can relate to. The setting of a halloween party provides the setting for something that couples tend to do together and can show loving moments, yet also provides the setting for betrayal and alienation with strange looking people making the girl feel alone.

Stay tuned for the video coming soon…

Here is the Full Article on Trackhustle.com

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MUSICIANS LEARN HOW TO GET A MILLION YOUTUBE VIEWS

Lots of people have videos on Youtube that reach a million views, but getting a million views based on musical talent is rare. It is important to showcase your musical talent in the videos because that’s what you are promoting. There are a handful of Youtube Stars that understand this principle and continuously get millions of views on their Youtube channels. Here’s how you can do it.

BE CREATIVE
Find creative ways to showcase your music. Do something that is so awesome that people have to show their friends. There are some really cheap video editing programs that do special effects. Experiment with a green screen and see what cool ideas you can come up with.

BE CONSISTENT
Don’t post one video and get mad when it doesn’t hit a million views in the first week. The most popular Youtube Stars post videos on a regular basis. You really don’t know which video will go viral so just post quality videos and build your fan base.

BE STICKY
Ever wonder how these Youtube Stars views are so high on all of their videos? Its because after fans discover their Youtube channel, they watch multiple videos. If the videos have similarities, they watch another video. Soon, they’ve watched all the videos on the channel. Have a central theme to your videos. Consider covering popular bands’ songs or accepting musical challenges from your viewers.

PROMOTE YOUR CHANNEL
This is pretty self-explanatory. Promote your videos on social networks to get people to watch your videos. This is not limited to the internet. Make sure all your friends and family watch the videos you post. Youtube also has several built-in features that allow you to promote your videos to other Youtubers.

SPONSOR A VIDEO
If all else fails, you could approach a Youtube Star that is already established and sponsor a future video of theirs. This does not necessarily mean pay money either. Try writing a song for them or send them some of your music and merchandise to give away.

Check this video of Mike Kalombo making a beat for Shane Dawson

BE CONNECTED
Contact people that you admire on Youtube by sending them a message. Introduce yourself and tell them what you like about their videos. By befriending other Youtubers, you can learn more tips for success. You could even collaborate some time down the line to cross promote each other’s Youtube channels. Don’t be afraid to reach out to top level Youtube Stars for advice.

BE PATIENT
There are a lot of undiscovered musicians getting millions of views on Youtube. Don’t be discouraged if your great content does not get a lot of views at first. Once more and more people discover your channel your views will eventually increase.

Remember, you are aiming to get millions of views to gain millions of fans. Don’t chase the record labels and major corporations. Make them come to you. Once you build your audience, they will approach you to work with them to expose their brands to your fan base.

Check this video of DeStorm jumping on board with a Pepsi campaign and gaining awareness for himself at the same time by bringing a lot of positive energy.

Fan Engagement – Creating Behind The Scenes Content

This article I found on Weallmakemusic.com says that it might be worth documenting more aspects of the creative process. Fans want to be as intimate as possible with their favorite artists (without being creepy), and creating content that gives an inside look at the processes of writing, rehearsing, recording in the booth, shooting video, etc. can bring your fans closer than ever. So many artists have only live performances and music videos available and don’t offer more of an inside look at who the artist is behind the scenes. More fan engagement means a stronger bond to you and your music, and can directly translate to more money in your pocket.

Just the other day I was on my facebook and photos from MSTRKRFT’s most recent tour popped up on my feed. There are a bunch of behind the scenes pictures of the backstage chilling, the limo ride to the show, and the post performance tiredness. You wouldn’t believe the feedback that MSTRKRFT got from those behind the scenes photos.

Full Article on Weallmakemusic.com

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Get More Mileage Out of Your Projects By Bringing Your Fans Into Your World

by ADAM SISENWEIN on NOVEMBER 17, 2010 · VIEW COMMENTS

The David Crowder*Band and friends give a behind the scenes look of how they made their latest music video

There’s a very good reason people do things like take pictures, write journals (or, these days, blogs), and collect souvenirs. We want to capture a moment in time and hold on to it, reflect on it later and possibly share it with others, make them feel like they were there.

The David Crowder*Band have just released a great example of how bands should do that, too.

It came time for the group to make a music video for their song “SMS (Shine)” and it soon became clear that it would be a pretty big production. The video would involve a very elaborate stop-motion animation sequence involving many Lite-Brite boards, plastic wrap, and many intricate banners made of tissue paper.

Knowing that making the video would be an experience in and of itself, the band decided to film the entire process, setting up cameras that rolled for hours, capturing the hard and tedious tasks involved with the project. Each band member also filmed interviews that went over what inspired their creative decisions and what the whole process was like.

The end results include not only a music video to promote the single, but the series of making-of videos that promotes pretty much everything David Crowder*Band-related and further showcases their talent and relatability.

In other words, whenever you are writing, practicing, recording, touring, or undertaking any big creative project, document it somehow: take pictures, record video, write about the events. Create a path that allows your fans into your process. Logistically, the edited result of your extra works may become exclusives for fans of your Facebook page or e-mail list, while there are also bonus materials to entice potential new fans.

Your music and work is an extension of who you are. Your fans may feel a closeness and attachment when they hardly even know you as a person. For a musician to share an experience with their fans regarding their creative process is something very special, and can be even more insightful than only a song or music video.

Trackhustle.com and More Out of the Box Promotional Ideas

Earlier today I posted something from I site I hadn’t heard of before called trackhustle.com. I would suggest that any aspiring hip hop artist check out this site. It is especially interesting to me because Trackhustle looks a lot like where I want to be with Chi Guy Entertainment in the near future in terms the services offered and the assistance they give artists.

This post takes a look at some truly awesome album cover designs. Although I am not the biggest proponent of selling physical albums, many people do still buy physical music (physical is still dominating digital in terms of revenues generated). One very impressive thing can be said: Tomorrow I will take time out of my day to go to a store and buy a physical copy of Beck’s new 4 track release.  Pictures of Beck’s-8Bit album design.

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3 INTERESTING AND INNOVATIVE CD PACKAGING DESIGNS

Beck’s-8Bit album design

Vonnegut Dollhouse’s Dollhouse CD Packaging


Moldover CD Packaging


Press Release Guide

This is a post about writing press releases I found on trackhustle.com. About a month ago I posted another guide to press releases that takes a slightly different approach.

I have yet to make a serious effort to develop my press kit, but I will be ready soon. I know that Reverbnation offers their own version of the press kit called the RPK (Reverb Press Kit) that includes things like video content, photo content, your music and your schedule. But I think I would rather post my press kit on my website. Since my website isn’t ready yet I might post my info to my RPK in the meantime. However, this service does cost $5.95 (which is equal to the cost of a similar service on Sonicbids).

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MUSIC PROMOTION 101: ALBUM PRESS RELEASE GUIDE

A well written press release is the first step in getting some attention for your new album. Use this template to help you organize your information. Note that this template was written with bands and indie labels in mind as the writers and the media in mind as the readers. PR folks and radio pluggers will want to take a slightly different approach with their press releases, and one sheets for distributors and stores should also be slightly different.

The Header: Centered at the top of your page should be the band’s name and the album name. To make sure this information draws attention, make sure you use a larger text size than the rest of your release, and also use bold and/or italics. You can also set this information apart by putting it in a box. If the album is on a label, include the label name and/or catalog number here as well.

A few optional inclusions for the header are:

– A scanned photo of the album cover
– Contact information for the person handling press for the release in the band or at the label
(labels consider having your logo along the top of the page – ideally in the top right or left corner)
– A quote from a good review of the band.
– The band and/or label’s website/MySpace page

Paragraph One: This is where you want to announce the new album. Go for a strong lead sentence, and if this is a follow-up album, make reference to previous work by the band that the reader may know about. If this is a debut album, say so, and give a few clues about the sounds of the album. This is also the place to mention any “big ticket” selling points for the album or band, such as:

– Praise from well known artist, producer, DJ, etc
– A well known guest star on the album
– A song that has received a lot of radio play
– The album was recorded in a well known studio or with a well known producer

Paragraph Two: In this paragraph, briefly expand a little bit about the band and the music on the album. This paragraph is very important for a new band with a debut album. Don’t mistake this for a band bio – which should be separate – but include some info about where the band comes from, influences, and again, any “big ticket” selling points. Keep this paragraph brief.

Paragraph Three: This paragraph is for giving your reader clear reasons why they should write about your band and review your album (and just saying because it’s a great album won’t cut it). Use this paragraph to mention things like:

– Tour dates planned in support of the new album
(if your shows planned but not confirmed, something like “shows planned for June 2010” will do)
– Reviews that you know are forthcoming in well known publications/on respected websites
– Any radio play the album has received (or that you know it will be receiving)

The Closing: At the bottom of your press release should be the contact info for the person fielding press queries for the album, even if this information is also at the top of your page. Set this information apart from the body of your press release in the same manner as you did the header – again, a box around the text works great, as does a larger type size or bolding/italicizing the text. Be sure to make clear what this information is for by saying “for more information, promo requests or to set up an interview, please contact (so and so).” Also include the band and/or label’s website/MySpace page here.

via Heather McDonald

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