Archive for the ‘ Promoting Your Music ’ Category

Making Moves – Promoting a YouTube Video

I recently posted my most successful YouTube video. Although it hasn’t blown up and been a gigantic viral success, it’s my first video to reach outside of my circle of core fans. In its first four days of being up it has received 160 views and I’m working hard to get more each day.

It has become a core part of hip hop to release free material, oftentimes using instrumentals from popular songs, to promote your own material. So I picked a song that was released last week by Lil Wayne called “6 Foot 7 Foot” that I could tell right off the bat would become a big hit. It’s produced by Bangladesh, the same producer that did “A Millie” with Wayne on The Carter III.

I made the video using iMovie, which came with my MacBook, and photos from my live shows and music video shoots. Using the editing tools available on YouTube and iMovie I added lyrics to the video in the form of blurbs coming out of my mouth, I added title screens to the beginning and end of the vid, and I made it look like I was moving to the music by aligning the pictures to go with the beat.

Some key pointers on how to post a successful YouTube vid and promote it:

1. Keep it short, sweet and entertaining. My video is 1:18 in total and in that time I showcase my lyrics, get my name out there, and link to my other music.

2. Relate your promotional video to something that people are already interested in. Lil Wayne has a huge following already established, so when he releases new material people are going to want to listen to it and talk about it. If you can find the sites where people are talking about related topics and showcase your video there, you might strike a cord with another artist’s fans. For example, I posted my video on http://www.lilwaynehq.com, where there are thousands of people discussing Wayne in very active forums. After one day I got over 30 independent views from that site alone.

3. Get familiar with YouTube’s editing tools. I can’t believe how much extra work you can do after you upload footage to youtube. You can add annotations, add links to your other material and have it all streamlined right into your video.

Making Moves 6 – Budgeting for a Music Video

I kept notes of the whole music video production process so others can see and plan their own projects.

You’re Welcome

The One Who Got Away Music Video Budget

Food/Drink $170

–       $40 Sandwiches, etc.

–       $50 pizza

–       $80 Alcohol

Wardrobe $322

–       $96 makeup, etc.

–       $16 Costumes

–       $210 = 30 + 180 Masks

Set Design $145

–       $90 fabric

–       $55 Christmas lights, paper to cover window, props

Equipment $80

–       $80 DSLR Cinema Support rental

$717 total spent on video

Equipment Used

Camera:

–       Canon Rebel T2i 550D DSLR

Other Equipment:

–       DSLR Cinema Support

–       Chrosziel Lightweight Follow-Focus

–       100mm Hi Hat

–       Kessler Cinelsider

–       Sachtler Cine 7+7 HD Tripod

Time Spent

Shooting Hours: 13.5 hours (Sat, Dec. 4 5:30pm-2:00am. Sun, Dec. 5 10:00am-3:00pm)

Set Design: 8 hours (Sat, Dec. 4 10:00am-5:00pm. Sun Dec. 5 9:00am-10:00am)

Labor

23 people in total (15 actors, 7 production crew, 1 director)

Making Moves 6 – Making a Low Budget Music Video (pt. 1)

This past weekend was a busy one for me. A group of people transformed the living room of my apartment into a music video set and we successfully shot the video for my song “The One Who Got Away.” It’s the third low budget film set I have been a part of in the last two months as my roommate and one of his friends have shot 2 films over that time. Let’s just say that the smell of stale smoke machine air is quite familiar to me now.

It’s a beautiful thing to see it all come together, to see people devote their time and energy to create something bigger than themselves (for free). We rented and borrowed as much as possible, yet still ran up a bit of a tab. Quality has its price. Although the video was in planning for over a month, there were still some unforeseen problems we ran into on the days of the shoot. The problems mostly involved actors (friends) not showing up, and shot setup taking longer than planned. But it helped a lot to write a detailed shot list and schedule.

Photos of the video shoot are up on my facebook page

Online Video Distribution: Getting More YouTube Views

 

This post that I found on Trackhustle.com gives some tips on how to appeal to a wider audience on YouTube. The videos in the article all succeeded in reaching a large audience and you could learn a lot just be viewing them. These tips are very timely because I am shooting a video this weekend and am hoping to reach a wide audience through a strong viral campaign on YouTube. The video is for my song The One Who Got Away, and has been in the works for over a month now. One of the key takeaways from the article on Trackhustle that I hope we will achieve is to “do something that is so awesome that people have to show their friends.”

Emmett Adler, the director, and I have developed a pretty great story line that follows closely with the lyrics of the song, but takes place at a halloween party. The song is about the regrets of lost love and missed opportunities so it is a universal theme that a lot of people can relate to. The setting of a halloween party provides the setting for something that couples tend to do together and can show loving moments, yet also provides the setting for betrayal and alienation with strange looking people making the girl feel alone.

Stay tuned for the video coming soon…

Here is the Full Article on Trackhustle.com

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MUSICIANS LEARN HOW TO GET A MILLION YOUTUBE VIEWS

Lots of people have videos on Youtube that reach a million views, but getting a million views based on musical talent is rare. It is important to showcase your musical talent in the videos because that’s what you are promoting. There are a handful of Youtube Stars that understand this principle and continuously get millions of views on their Youtube channels. Here’s how you can do it.

BE CREATIVE
Find creative ways to showcase your music. Do something that is so awesome that people have to show their friends. There are some really cheap video editing programs that do special effects. Experiment with a green screen and see what cool ideas you can come up with.

BE CONSISTENT
Don’t post one video and get mad when it doesn’t hit a million views in the first week. The most popular Youtube Stars post videos on a regular basis. You really don’t know which video will go viral so just post quality videos and build your fan base.

BE STICKY
Ever wonder how these Youtube Stars views are so high on all of their videos? Its because after fans discover their Youtube channel, they watch multiple videos. If the videos have similarities, they watch another video. Soon, they’ve watched all the videos on the channel. Have a central theme to your videos. Consider covering popular bands’ songs or accepting musical challenges from your viewers.

PROMOTE YOUR CHANNEL
This is pretty self-explanatory. Promote your videos on social networks to get people to watch your videos. This is not limited to the internet. Make sure all your friends and family watch the videos you post. Youtube also has several built-in features that allow you to promote your videos to other Youtubers.

SPONSOR A VIDEO
If all else fails, you could approach a Youtube Star that is already established and sponsor a future video of theirs. This does not necessarily mean pay money either. Try writing a song for them or send them some of your music and merchandise to give away.

Check this video of Mike Kalombo making a beat for Shane Dawson

BE CONNECTED
Contact people that you admire on Youtube by sending them a message. Introduce yourself and tell them what you like about their videos. By befriending other Youtubers, you can learn more tips for success. You could even collaborate some time down the line to cross promote each other’s Youtube channels. Don’t be afraid to reach out to top level Youtube Stars for advice.

BE PATIENT
There are a lot of undiscovered musicians getting millions of views on Youtube. Don’t be discouraged if your great content does not get a lot of views at first. Once more and more people discover your channel your views will eventually increase.

Remember, you are aiming to get millions of views to gain millions of fans. Don’t chase the record labels and major corporations. Make them come to you. Once you build your audience, they will approach you to work with them to expose their brands to your fan base.

Check this video of DeStorm jumping on board with a Pepsi campaign and gaining awareness for himself at the same time by bringing a lot of positive energy.

Fan Engagement – Creating Behind The Scenes Content

This article I found on Weallmakemusic.com says that it might be worth documenting more aspects of the creative process. Fans want to be as intimate as possible with their favorite artists (without being creepy), and creating content that gives an inside look at the processes of writing, rehearsing, recording in the booth, shooting video, etc. can bring your fans closer than ever. So many artists have only live performances and music videos available and don’t offer more of an inside look at who the artist is behind the scenes. More fan engagement means a stronger bond to you and your music, and can directly translate to more money in your pocket.

Just the other day I was on my facebook and photos from MSTRKRFT’s most recent tour popped up on my feed. There are a bunch of behind the scenes pictures of the backstage chilling, the limo ride to the show, and the post performance tiredness. You wouldn’t believe the feedback that MSTRKRFT got from those behind the scenes photos.

Full Article on Weallmakemusic.com

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Get More Mileage Out of Your Projects By Bringing Your Fans Into Your World

by ADAM SISENWEIN on NOVEMBER 17, 2010 · VIEW COMMENTS

The David Crowder*Band and friends give a behind the scenes look of how they made their latest music video

There’s a very good reason people do things like take pictures, write journals (or, these days, blogs), and collect souvenirs. We want to capture a moment in time and hold on to it, reflect on it later and possibly share it with others, make them feel like they were there.

The David Crowder*Band have just released a great example of how bands should do that, too.

It came time for the group to make a music video for their song “SMS (Shine)” and it soon became clear that it would be a pretty big production. The video would involve a very elaborate stop-motion animation sequence involving many Lite-Brite boards, plastic wrap, and many intricate banners made of tissue paper.

Knowing that making the video would be an experience in and of itself, the band decided to film the entire process, setting up cameras that rolled for hours, capturing the hard and tedious tasks involved with the project. Each band member also filmed interviews that went over what inspired their creative decisions and what the whole process was like.

The end results include not only a music video to promote the single, but the series of making-of videos that promotes pretty much everything David Crowder*Band-related and further showcases their talent and relatability.

In other words, whenever you are writing, practicing, recording, touring, or undertaking any big creative project, document it somehow: take pictures, record video, write about the events. Create a path that allows your fans into your process. Logistically, the edited result of your extra works may become exclusives for fans of your Facebook page or e-mail list, while there are also bonus materials to entice potential new fans.

Your music and work is an extension of who you are. Your fans may feel a closeness and attachment when they hardly even know you as a person. For a musician to share an experience with their fans regarding their creative process is something very special, and can be even more insightful than only a song or music video.

Trackhustle.com and More Out of the Box Promotional Ideas

Earlier today I posted something from I site I hadn’t heard of before called trackhustle.com. I would suggest that any aspiring hip hop artist check out this site. It is especially interesting to me because Trackhustle looks a lot like where I want to be with Chi Guy Entertainment in the near future in terms the services offered and the assistance they give artists.

This post takes a look at some truly awesome album cover designs. Although I am not the biggest proponent of selling physical albums, many people do still buy physical music (physical is still dominating digital in terms of revenues generated). One very impressive thing can be said: Tomorrow I will take time out of my day to go to a store and buy a physical copy of Beck’s new 4 track release.  Pictures of Beck’s-8Bit album design.

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3 INTERESTING AND INNOVATIVE CD PACKAGING DESIGNS

Beck’s-8Bit album design

Vonnegut Dollhouse’s Dollhouse CD Packaging


Moldover CD Packaging


Musical Mission Statements

I have said before that managing your social media campaigns can be like a full time job and can eat into precious time that would otherwise be devoted to writing performing or connecting with real people. This article on The DIY Musician Blog entitled “Musical Mission Statements, Sanity & You” says KEEP IT SIMPLE STUPID.

I haven’t formally worked on a mission statement before. What I have done is start a campaign called The Classical Movement, which gives praise to and shines light on the period of hip hop that I find most inspiring and what I fell in love with in the beginning. This is a time period between about 1992 – 1997 during which many of my favorite rappers debuted with their smartest, and powerful material. With The Classical Movement I aim to get back to that wittiness and achieve that raw sound that I loved from that period in time. With my material outside of the realm of The Classical Movement I aim to push the boundaries of hip hop by experimenting with different sounds and genres. I also love the idea of the concept album in hip hop. Having a story line really gives the listener a more complete vision of the artist’s vision and allows the artist to express a bigger and more complete thought. So that’s a long version of my mission statement. Working on shortening that, ha.

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Here is the article from The DIY Musician Blog from CD Baby:

Practicing. Writing. Recording. Booking. Web design. Social media. Videos. Marketing. PR.  Driving yourself mad wondering where to shift your focus? Go back to the basics.

Remember your mission statement!

Don’t have a mission statement? Make one. What would it look like? Here are some examples:

1) We are in it to win it. Fame and riches are our first concern.

2) All music that has come before is dead. We must strive to blaze our own path. Uniqueness!

3) Music is only a part of our balanced lives. We make music in order to have fun and improve our sense of well-being.

4) Music is our way of creating positive change on the planet. Social-consciousness!

5) Mystery is key. We must obscure, evade, and sidestep. Through a sense of enigma, we will forge our true connection with an audience.

Why should you state what your mission is upfront?

1) It will ensure that everyone involved in your band, group, or organization is on the same page. Your goals will be aligned, and that united sense of purpose will inspire your collective work ethic and creativity. If you make music on your own and direct your own career, you should still state your mission to keep yourself in check and better understand your goals. The better you understand yourself, the easier it will be to know how to connect with an audience.

2) For sanity’s sake. DIY artists already have enough on their plates. You can’t do it all. You’re going to have to let some opportunities pass you by. You’re going to have to let some responsibilities slip through the cracks. But which ones? Worrying about this can drive you mad. But by remembering your mission statement you can hold each decision up to that light.

-Chris R. at CD Baby


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